Biga Dough Pizza Recipe - Featured Recipe - CookingDistrict.com
Featured Recipes

Biga Dough Pizza Recipe

Photo by Lisa McLaughlin
6-time World Champion pizza chef Bruno Di Fabio offers up this Biga style dough recipe for at-home chefs to use for their own personally-designed pizza. In addition to winning six world championships, Bruno Di Fabio is the co-founder of the International School of Pizza and several artisan pizzerias throughout the country. Di Fabio has been featured as a guest judge on a pizza episode of Food Network's Chopped.
Categories: Doughs, Pizza
Photo by Lisa McLaughlin
Step 1
1 1/2 tsp • Dry yeast
1/2 tsp • Sugar
4 oz • warm water (95 to 100 degrees)
2 cups • water (room temperature or cool)
2 lb • high-gluten flour (not all-purpose)
Add the dry yeast to the warm water. Stir slightly. Let stand for 2-3 minutes.

In a large mixing bowl, add the 2 cups of water, the yeast water, and the sugar and mix until the sugar is dissolved

Add the 2 lbs of high-gluten flour and mix only until the ingredients are blended. The mix will feel slightly dry and lumpy; this is OK.

Place a dish towel or cheese cloth over the bowl to completely cover it.

Let stand for 15-18 hours at room temperature. The dough will triple in size and give off an amazing aroma. This is now referred to as your biga.
Step 2
2 lb • high-gluten flour
2 cup • Cold water
1/2 tsp • Sugar
3/4 tsp • Sea salt
4 tbsp • Olive oil
Phase 2:

Uncover your biga and add the remaining 2 lbs of flour and the 2 cups of cold water. Mix until all ingredients are incorporated.

Make a well in the middle of the dough and add salt and mix until incorporated.

Make a well in the middle of the dough and add olive oil and mix until incorporated.

Let the biga rest for 10 minutes covered. This should yield about 5 pounds of dough.

Divide the dough into sections to about a pound each and roll them into balls.

Note: Keep each dough ball in its own container that is slightly coated with olive oil and covered. Refrigerate for 3 days before using. This two stage fermentation room temperature, and cold rise fermentation process allows the dough to develop great flavor. It yields a crust that is very light, airy, and crisp. This is also a crust that will be very digestible with the yeast having broken down complex starches in the flour.
Step 3
Cooking Options (After dough is made)

1. Gas Fired Home Deck Oven : On lightly dusted work surface stretch out your dough by evenly pressing with your finger tips over entire surface until dough is about 9 or 10 inches in diameter. Then pick up dough and extend it between your hands, and rotate five to ten times until dough is roughly 15 inches in diameter. Do not over think this method, the stretching of this dough should be fun and the dough does not have to be perfectly round. Remember if it isn't perfectly round it is rustic, which is a cool culinary term constantly over used, but perfect in this situation. Place stretched dough on semolina dusted pizza peel. After the pizza is topped, slide onto the brick deck and cook for 9 to 12 minutes until evenly browned. (oven should be preheated to 500 degrees oven)

2. Home Oven : Using a teaspoon of olive oil, evenly coat a cookie sheet (at least 14" square) and dust with flour. This is your alternative to using a pizza peel and pizza stone. This method is just as effective. Then on lightly dusted work surface stretch out your dough by evenly pressing with your finger tips over entire surface until dough is about 9 or 10 inches in diameter. Then pick up dough and extend it between your hands, and rotate five to ten times until dough is roughly 15 inches in diameter. Then place your stretched dough on cookie sheet, add your toppings, and cook for 9 to 12 minutes in a preheated 500 degree oven until evenly browned.
Notes

Comments

dbruce1 • 05/24/2014
Hello there, any chance of recording the recipes in metric, so that the rest of the world outside of America doesn't have to guess the weights?
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